Thursday, January 10, 2008

Answer me these:

What is fiction? Is the difference between literature and can-be-used-against-you not the distance between reality and what's on the page (greater, one imagines, in fiction than in rant), but rather the quality of the prose? My sense is yes. Whether we're speaking about violent plays or an unreadable livejournal calling itself "fiction" while discussing real-life situations, something horribly written is rant and thus evidence, whereas something well-written is literature. One can point to the unfairness of an important author's depictions of real people, but the quickest way to place yourself on the wrong side of history is to limit a brilliant artist's creativity.

What is libertarianism? Here's a helpful introduction, but I'm still confused.

What is conservatism, and why would a libertarian today identify as a Republican? If social conservatism went (returned?) to the left, would this topple the right, or are my political views shared by more than three other people?

5 comments:

Withywindle said...

Why would libertarians vote Republican? Because they're one of the political groups for which economics often trumps social and foreign policy issues, and some of them can be persuaded that the Democrats are worse than the Republicans.

Phoebe said...

Fair enough. A better question, if I may rephrase: Why would libertarians enthusiastically vote Republican?

Jacob T. Levy said...

Hmm-- thanks for the link, but I doubt that anything in my post is a useful *introduction* to the category "libertarian." I'm talking about old divides within that category, not about what (sometimes) unites the two sides.

Phoebe said...

I found it useful, not as a wikipedia-style intro for someone having for the first time heard the word, but for understanding what it means, say, during this election.

Withywindle said...

"Why would libertarians enthusiastically vote Republican?"

What makes you think any other political grouping is more enthusiastic about voting Republican/Democrat? I rather think most people vote against someone, or for someone tepidly, with deep misgivings and irritation. Enthusiasm? Rare, grasshopper.