Tuesday, March 24, 2009

The best of shopping

Just as I have not been updating Goodreads, yet have been reading plenty of books, I have not posted on my driving lessons, although I've had many. Many, many, and I still pretty much can't drive. The reading's going a whole lot better than the driving. They say parallel parking is hard, but what about making a left turn from one two-way street to another? In or near Chinatown? But it's not the neighborhood's fault - give me a wide, open street in suburbia and I'd find a way to not get from Point A to Point B smoothly.

That said, the great thing about the driving lessons is their location on the Chinatown-Little Italy-Nolita border. What this means is access to the most fabulous groceries and shoes the city has to offer. This time I went the Italian route, and am very much looking forward to the DiPalo feasts that await me.

Then, that Major Question of Our Age, 'Where does one buy shoes?', was answered, once and for all. I found where they keep the shoes I want, all of them. The brands whose shoes I covet most* - Repetto and Camper - were both represented and (thanks, crap economy!) steeply discounted. The shoes I ended up with were from neither of those brands and, though cheaper than the discounted Campers and Repettos, cost, I now see, slightly more than on Amazon. Boo. But still not very much, and given that I can't even reliably get deliveries to my apartment and would be too embarrassed to get shoes shipped to my office, it's kind of irrelevant. (For the lone reader still awake: the ribbon is removable, which is good because I'm still not sure what I think about that feature.) Finding a pair of ballet flats with some cushioning on the inside, that look good, that actually cover your whole sole (these, though comfortable-looking, are one dog-not-picked-up-for away from $104.95 down the drain), and that are far enough under $100 that you can live with yourself after getting them is quite the challenge. So, err, challenge met. Now, onto bigger and better things, like spinach ravioli...

*Because these brands tend to have beautiful shoes. It's not like a Burberry scarf thing. In fact, I almost wish I had more brand loyalties - an almost complete lack of brand loyalty when it comes to such things as shampoo and conditioner makes for many lost minutes spent gazing blankly at the haircare aisle of Duane Reade.

4 comments:

PG said...

I always wondered how people who grew up in NYC learned to drive. I had huge parking lots at the local college, no one-way streets, the 6 lane highway between my home and my high school... and I struggled with driving anyway. But since Texas gives out licenses without having to take anything more than the written exam*, I've now had a license for 11 years and I still can't parallel park without someone standing on the curb yelling directions. (I've collected some speeding tickets, but never had an accident with a moving vehicle.) I swear there's a height disadvantage -- I'm 5'2 and most of my height is in my legs, so I really can't see well how far the car extends in the front and back.

* Even this ranks with the military test and the Bureau of Labor Statistics as one of my poorest standardized tests, though as with the military and BLS, it doesn't seem to have prevented them from making me an offer.

dance said...

Agree with you that brand loyalty is very helpful and efficient. It also allows one to stock up on sales and reduce the need to shop in the first place. I celebrate when I develop a brand loyalty.

Dana said...

They're not super beautiful, but Me Too Nevada flats are cushiony. I covet Frye flats, which are cushiony and beautiful--and really expensive. I have no ballet flats right now. The horror.

Phoebe said...

Well, I'm at Day 1 of the Hollywould pair, and so far so good. They have yet to fall off while I walk, or to cause any injuries that would send me to one of those podiatrists with ads on the subway. The only possible problem with them is that they are very, very shiny -more like kids' shoes than women's - but I see this as a good thing.